Doctor Who? Philosophy? Combined?

Already zipped through Ultimate Regeneration (three times) and looking for your next Doctor-Who-related nonfiction book to read?  The latest installment in Open Court Publishing’s famous Popular Culture and Philosophy series, which already includes Star Trek and Philosophy, Facebook and Philosophy, and Bulls**t and Philosophy, is here to save the day!

Doctor Who and Philosophy was conceived more than a decade ago by Courtland Lewis in his early adult life as an American Doctor Who fan living in the hiatus years as he gathered a collection of videotapes from his preferred childhood show and began writing down some favourite quotes from it that he might like to see in a book.  Open Court began printing the Popular Culture and Philosophy range around the year 2000, but it wasn’t until 2007 when Lewis, then a philosophy student/teaching assistant, had a professor who knew the editor of Open Court, and thus three years of compiling 33 essays along with co-editor Paula Smithka began.

According to Lewis (and, frankly, to most of us Whovians), the best show ever and contemplations of life, the universe, and everything go hand-in-hand:

“Doctor Who is an analogy for philosophy.  What a philosopher has to do is search for wisdom … attempt to understand the unknown and have a willingness to change his mind.”

Articles by a variety of authors in Doctor Who and Philosophy discuss such topics as self-identity, discovery, beauty, and human existence as expressed in the show in all eleven of its major eras.

Doctor Who and Philosophy is available on Amazon right now for a discounted price of £10.49 (RRP £12.99), or if you just want the Kindle version, £9.44.

(via KnoxNews.com)



Patrick Riley

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Patrick has just been murdered and is currently seated on the edge of a lawn chair wondering when this Missy person will stop demanding his autograph. He probably can't tweet from the grave, but you should follow him anyway @10PatrickRiley.


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