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Time Lord Inspiration

What do Doctor Who fans want to be when they grow up? Its an interesting question; do genre TV programmes breed fans who all migrate to certain jobs? Do Star Trek fans become scientist and cognitive neuroscientists like Dr. Daniel J. Levitin because of the shows progressive and egalitarian message?

Peter Anghelides - the Doctor Who novelist behind audiobooks Pest Control and The Chaos Pool and novels Frontier Worlds and The Ancestor Cell (which was placed ninth in SFX Magazines Best SF/Fantasy novelisation or TV tie-in novel for 2000) – believes that Doctor Who fans are more interested in the mechanics of television, and tend to badger careers advisers with bold plans for becoming writers, directors and producers more than any other genre fans.

Anghelides, posting off-cuts from his recent interview with Sci Fi Now Magazine, said:

“Doctor Who was an early childhood enthusiasm, so it certainly featured in my writing then, or the games I acted out, or the films I made on Super 8. Followed by fan magazines. Followed by the chance to get published professionally.”

It’s these professional routes that allow fans to get a foot in the door and contribute to the multi-platform world of Who. Writers like Mark Gatiss, Gareth Roberts, Robert Shearman have all previously contributed to other Who mediums; Anghelides concurs:  

“The media is more varied, so with audios you have to work with the expectation that families listening to it on the car CD player have it as a shared experience like watching the telly, and aren’t going to skip back a few tracks to work out what happened, whereas with a novel it’s a solitary experience that you can scan back over if you wish. You can see a greater variety of styles and tone – yet paradoxically all still “true” to the TV series.”

And as these mediums mix, their importance grows even if the metaphorical axe falls again on the TV series – Anghelides comments;

“I can’t see it ever stopping completely, in one form or another. It’s the show that comes back. But I don’t really stop to think about that. Why worry about it? Be in the moment. Enjoy it wholeheartedly for what it is while we’ve got it, right now. The glass isn’t half empty. It isn’t half-full either, it’s spilling right over the edges.”

Visit Peter’s blog at peteranghelides.wordpress.com for the full excerpt.


Everyone has a favourite Doctor and mine - just for his honesty, his fairness and his ability to not notice the Master's awful, awful disguises/anagrams (Sir Gilles Estram!?!) - has to be the Fifth Doctor, Peter Davison. The stories didn’t serve him as well as his acting served those stories.

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