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Barry Jackson as Drax in Doctor Who: The Armageddon Factor

Barry Jackson 1938-2013

British character actor and stunt arranger Barry Jackson has died today, aged 75. Best known for his recurring role in Midsomer Murders from 1997–2011, Jackson also had several Doctor Who roles, most notably as dodgy geezer Time Lord Drax in The Armageddon Factor back in 1979.

Appearing in The Romans in 1965 as assassin Ascaris and later that year in The Daleks’ Master Plan prologue Mission to the Unknown as Jeff Garvey, Birmingham-born Barry Jackson had a string of TV credits to his name, such as A For Andromeda, The Troubleshooters, Doomwatch, The New Avengers, The Professionals and even Coronation Street. Although recognised by Whovians as one of the more unusual Time Lords to appear in Doctor Who, it will probably be as pathologist Dr George Bullard in Midsomer Murders that Jackson will be best remembered. Interestingly, the actor was unavailable for some early episodes in the show’s run (due to being on tour in a Harold Pinter play), resulting in a second character, Dan Peterson, being introduced as a short-term replacement – played by the Dream Lord himself, Toby Jones.

Barry Jackson, who also appeared in the film Ryan’s Daughter and in Blake’s 7, died at his home in north London with his family in attendance.

(Via Toby Hadoke on Facebook)

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