Great Intelligence

What You Thought of The Snowmen

Wow. An overwhelming majority of you have spoken – but what is your favourite Christmas special?

All the way back in the days before snow, desperation and isolation, we asked you which modern Christmas special you like best, and you voted in your masses. Let’s find out which festive tale is the best present you got under the Christmas tree (or wherever you kool kids keep the TV these days)…

8. The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe – 0.82%

Ah-wells

Sitting in last position, this wintery tale of a living forest, a lost husband and acid rain garnered little love. It might not be your favourite en masse, but it features one of the loveliest endings in Doctor Who history – and was still the best thing shown on Christmas Day, 2011.

7. The Next Doctor – 2.74%

Maybe it was the disappointing use of the Cybermen, or the creation of the CyberKing, or perhaps the low production value of the Cybershade that got this 2008 special just 2.74% of the vote. It’s a shame, as it featured a brilliant guest actor tackling a surprising and sad subject, and really got the audience’s attention after the announcement that David Tennant was to leave the iconic role.

6. Voyage of the Damned – 3.29%

It featured Kylie! Voc-like Heavenly Host! An outer-space replica of the Titanic! And the Queen wishing the Doctor a merry Christmas! But while Voyage of the Damned should’ve been a massive success, the 2007 episode instead had a grim tone with plenty of pointless deaths. This Christmas dessert sadly proved to be more stodgy pudding than light and cheery trifle.

5. The Runaway Bride – 3.84%

Companion-to-be Donna Noble debuted in this festive treat, which also showcased a giant, red spider, sparkling Huon particles, and an exciting motorway chase… with the TARDIS! However, something made this 2006 story sink into the Thames, rather than shine like a Christmas star.

4. The End of Time – 10.14%

Despite having a poorly-written Master at its centre, The End of Time, which straddled 2009 and 2010, did pretty well in the poll. Maybe we’re all still a bit teary at the Tenth Doctor’s last words, or perhaps we’re still in shock at the clever ‘knock-four-times’ twist; either way, a lot of you loved David Tennant’s send-off.

3. The Christmas Invasion – 13.15%

“They cut off his hand!” David Tennant’s first story as the Doctor – waaaay back in 2005 – remains hugely popular, showcasing all the elements we loved from Series 1, but paving the way to a bright future. It was bold and funny, yet warm and homely. Doctor Who was here to stay.

2. A Christmas Carol – 16.16%

A personal favourite, this 2010 special was all about love. And what better on Christmas day? Apart from the central theme, this beautiful story had some magnificent guest stars, a blindingly brilliant Doctor, Amy in her police costume, time travel, and a flying shark. Yes, it certainly was a novel idea. Ha ha ha! Gettit? Do you? Heh, heh… Shut up.

1.       The Snowmen – 49.59%

“That’s the way to do it!”

Nearly half of you thought that this year’s Christmas was the best one since The Feast of Steven. It’s not surprising, really, considering it debuted new companion, Clara Oswin Oswald, saw the return of three success stories from 2011’s A Good Man Goes To War, and acted as an origin story for the Great Intelligence. Some of you might’ve got carried away in the post-transmission madness, but the majority agree: Steven Moffat’s Christmas masterpiece is essential viewing.

Look out for a ReKap article on The Snowmen soon (for those of you just recovered from headaches) – as well as your reaction to the new opening titles. That’s right! This wasn’t the only poll we conducted over Christmas, so it’ll soon be time to find out which title sequence warms your heart the most…



About

When he’s not watching television, reading books ‘n’ Marvel comics, listening to The Killers, and obsessing over script ideas, Philip Bates pretends to be a freelance writer. He enjoys collecting everything.


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