Doctor Who: Voyage to Venus from Big Finish

Voyage to Venus: Litefoot, Jago and the Doctor Reunited!

The temptation when reviewing a Doctor Who story, or indeed any story, involving the fantastic investigators of infernal incidents Jago and Litefoot is to alliterate until the cows comes in, but let’s forego that and get to the meat of this review. Voyage to Venus is a fantastic tale of hi jinks and chicanery, of versatility and triumph and, above all, a story about enduring friendships.

Doctor Who: Voyage to Venus from Big Finish

Jago and Litefoot have been enjoying a rather healthy run of solo adventures away from the Doctor of late; Big Finish has had them solving some of London (and Earth’s) most puzzling mysteries with style and panache and all in time for tea. But it’s the Doctor that we’ve longed to see them reunited with and finally, Big Finish have answered the call.

Following on from events in their solo series (don’t worry, you don’t have to have listened to a single story to know what’s going on here, all continuity is left at the door) Litefoot and Jago find themselves aboard the good ship TARDIS with the Sixth Doctor and what a team they make. In fact only the Sixth Doctor could match the Fourth in verbal dexterity and wit whilst occasionally scathing Jago with the odd well-intentioned put down. As Victorian in personality as his two companions, this particular incarnation of the Doctor demands and enforces a respect from these two that other Doctor’s probably couldn’t which leads to all the more of a healthy respect given from both parties, it’s a wonderfully flowing dialogue that they have together.

[pullquote align=right]This is a great slice of Doctor Who for you to enjoy and at a price that will cost you less than the average book in Waterstones, you’d be a pathetically preposterous plonker to miss this adventure of such dazzling, dastardly deceptions.[/pullquote]Promising them all the sights that they could possibly hope to see, the new TARDIS crew arrive on Venus and are promptly captured by the planets inhabitants, a large amount of warrior women, which of course leads to all sorts of revelations about what the Queen of the people has been up to over the years and what she has done to the planet’s original dwellers.

But it’s not so much the plot that carries this piece as the performances. Jonathan Morris writes the characters of Jago and Litefoot true to form and gives each the time to develop and show off exactly what use they have for each other and why their partnership has lasted so long. Not an easy feat to accomplish in the space of an hour but thanks to some clever writing and touching performances by the leads, we get there safe and dry. In fact any newcomer to Doctor Who may well want to start here as it’s a nostalgic as well as bold start to what could well be something to look forward to more of in the future.

All said and done, this is a great slice of Doctor Who for you to enjoy and at a price that will cost you less than the average book in Waterstones, you’d be a pathetically preposterous plonker to miss this adventure of such dazzling, dastardly deceptions.

Oh come on, we had to.

Voyage to Venus is available from www.bigfinish.com now for £5.00 on CD or just £1.00 via download – you cannot miss such a great offer!



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What happens when an eight year old kid watches the 1993 repeat run of Planet of the Daleks? He pretty much ends up here writing about the show that grabbed hold of him and never let go!


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