Big Finish IDW's Star Trek and DW

Published on October 28th, 2012 | by Philip Bates

Masterson Talks Doctor Who

Chase Masterson, best known for playing Leeta in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, talked more about her work with Big Finish, in which she takes on the role of bounty hunter, Vienna Salvatore.

Masterson makes her Big Finish debut in Night of the Stormcrow with Tom Baker’s Fourth Doctor, a special audio adventure for subscribers only, before taking on the role of Vienna in The Shadow Heart opposite Sylvester McCoy’s Seventh Doctor. Her own audio series, Vienna, begins in February with The Memory Box.

In her article, Thrill of the Chase: Masterson Meets Doctor Who, she tells StarTrek.com about how she first came into contact with everyone’s favourite Time Lord:

At GalaxyFest in February, I met the enigmatic Frazer Hines, who played Jamie McCrimmon opposite Second Doctor, Patrick Troughton, (as well as in The Five Doctors in 1983 and The Two Doctors in 1985). Frazer is a well-loved, classic British actor from far too many projects to elaborate on, and one of the all-time favorite Companions on the show. I also met David J. Howe, noted Doctor Who media historian and author of virtually every go-to book on the series, and the delightful award-winning author Sam Stone. It’s tough not to have fun with the Brits, and over the course of an unforgettable weekend, they mentioned that they thought I should do Big Finish, and Fraz referred me to the producers.

And it seems that the lovely Chase really understands both shows:

Everyone wants to be a part of this collective quest of humanity, to add what we can while we’re here, and to glean what wisdom and relief we can from our fellow travelers. So no matter the year, the setting or the physical qualities of those we see on screen, we see ourselves in these shows’ characters. The writers of both Star Trek and Doctor Who are highly skilled in the use of metaphor and allegory to explore the fears, the triumphs, the dreams, the downfalls and the glories of what it means to be human.

After a rather superb and concise comparison of the two shows, she says more about how she got on with Baker and McCoy:

Tom and Sylvester were particularly generous with stories of working with other British greats, including Olivier and Gielgud and McKellen, and I even got Sylvester to do a command performance on the spoons. (If you don’t know what I mean, look this up. You’re welcome.)

It’s a skill that impressed then-Producer, John Nathan-Turner so much, Sylvester’s Doctor plays the spoons (on the Rani’s chest, no less) in Time and the Rani!

We also hear from Producer, David Richardson, and Big Finish Executive Producer (and voice of the Daleks and Cybermen), Nicholas Briggs, the latter of which says:

Sometimes I find myself thinking it’s just routine, because I’ve been doing it for so long – but then I pinch myself and think, I’m working with Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann AND Tom Baker! Tom’s our most recent addition, but it’s worth remembering that the others gave us their support from more-or-less day one, and they are all truly unique!

It really is a warm and charming article, well-worth a read, as it exudes a love for both Star Trek and, of course, the universe’s best sci-fi show (with all due respect, Trekkies): Doctor Who.

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About the Author

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When he’s not watching television, reading books ‘n’ Marvel comics, listening to The Killers, and obsessing over script ideas, Philip Bates pretends to be a freelance writer. He enjoys collecting everything.




One Response to Masterson Talks Doctor Who

  1. avatar BOJAY says:

    Chase has a knack for being sensitive to the spirituality that’s often present in good sci-fi/sci-fantasy. It’s an element that I think is present in some of the best Doctor Who and Star Trek. Please note, I am NOT talking about organized religion, but those elements that speak to and come forth from the deeper parts of us. What’s inside of us and these characters has much to do with how we an they respond to the situations and moral dilemmas that present themselves. I think it almost always adds layers that make things more interesting and involving.

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