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Published on October 2nd, 2011 | by Scott Varnham

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Petition To Save DWC Going Strong!

Four days ago, I wrote an article detailing a petition that has been set up by a fan (calling himself SaveDWC) to save the recently axed show Doctor Who Confidential and I was happy to see as a fan the outpouring of support for the show (the last episode of which aired yesterday). Bear in mind that I was happy at the time to see 3000 signatures then you’ll appreciate just how loved the show is, now that the petition has got 25,102 signatures and counting!

As well as the British viewers of Confidential, some people from other countries have mentioned SaveDWC on Twitter to show their support as well. But it’s not just fans of the show showing their support. People of note with links to Doctor Who have also lent their support to the petition including Russell Tovey (former narrator of the show),  Tom Macrae (writer of The Girl Who Waited) and, according to SaveDWC’s Twitter feed in the quote supplied below, The Grand Moff himself.

Why did nobody tell me @Steven_Moffat is following us. *Drops on the floor* – guys. This man agrees with us! YAY!!!!!!!!!! *Dances*

Even though the show had its problems, I think it’s telling that several people associated with Doctor Who have given their support to the petition; far more support than a show like Two Pints And A Packet Of Self-Loathing or Young, Dumb And Living Off Mum would get.

The problem seems to be that Doctor Who Confidential wasn’t just fun, but it was also educational for fans of the show and those wanting to learn more about the magic of television alike (as a media student and a viewer of Doctor Who Confidential, I can assure you it’s not magic). As Ian Redman, a fan who commented on the petition via Facebook, put it:

Doctor Who Confidential is easily the best show that currently airs on BBC Three. As someone who wants to work in the television industry, it’s also been a great learning resource for me. I really don’t want to see it end!

This is also supported by SaveDWC himself, who has given email interviews to various websites and publications including the Radio Times. At this point, it remains to be seen whether the BBC will reverse their decision to cancel the show and listen to the fans or if they’ll stubbornly stick to their guns. And it goes without saying: if you’ve not yet signed, what are you waiting for?

 

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About the Author

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In his spare time, Scott writes for Kasterborous, his personal blog at WordPress and the revived Starburst Magazine. He’s also on Twitter (as @Scott_V_Writer) where he tries to be interesting and verbose in 140 characters.




9 Responses to Petition To Save DWC Going Strong!

  1. avatar Ian O'Brien says:

    This from Edward Russell BBC brand manager on twitter about the petition:
    edwardrussell Edward Russell
    @
    @IanOTimelord @savedwc BBC Three have made their decision. Let’s celebrate the past but look to the future.

    edwardrussell Edward Russell
    @
    @IanOTimelord @savedwc Lobbying is counter productive. It does more harm than good to set up groups.
    SaveDWC Confidential
    @
    @edwardrussell @IanOTimelord Hi Edward. We’d have to disagree. All we are doing is amplifying the viewer’s voice. IMO That’s rule 1.
    edwardrussell Edward Russell
    @
    @SaveDWC @IanOTimelord Believe me – it IS counterproductive. BBC Complaints have logged this as lobbying and are treating it as such.

    My response was is he saying there is no point complaining

    edwardrussell Edward Russell
    @
    @IanOTimelord @savedwc no – I’m saying organised Internet campaigns are counter productive.

    Just thought I would share this with everyone, Christian hope its ok.

  2. avatar tommyscot says:

    It’s heartening to find that those who are close, or even at the heart of the production team, care for DWC.

    To repeat what I said in a previous post;
    I did miss the exposition of script to set; the taste of the reality of the editor’s rationale when it comes to telling the story in the time available- while satisfying the writers. Not enough of that in recent times.
    However throwing the concept out is hasty and short-sighted.
    First I’d like to see the return of the red button commentary. That was surely cheap enough.

    If cost cutting is required- why not allow media students and interns the chance to make a Confidential style web-cast? Low cost, supporting young talent too.

  3. avatar Alex says:

    The attitude being shown that this campaign is “counterproductive” is puzzling. If this were 1985 and Grade had just cancelled Doctor Who, but we had the Internet, guess what fans would have used to get the show brought back for Trial of a Time Lord? If the Internet had existed, what would Bjo Trimble and her cohorts have used in 1967 when the original Star Trek faced cancellation and they lobbied NBC successfully to bring the show back – the Internet. What has been used to successfully get a number of shows “stays of execution” in recent years in America? The Internet. When Doctor Who itself is cancelled – as it will be eventually – guess what will be the response and in what venue? It’s the attitude “the fans just need to roll over and accept it” that’s counter-productive. They’re getting a clear indication of viewer interest here. But if they don’t want to accept the Internet as viable, maybe it’s time for fans to start flooding the BBC’s offices with letters and fezzes.

  4. avatar Caity says:

    When perceived as lobbying through one website it is counterproductive. They just produce a “standard line” and repeat it ad nauseam. Individual emails of support would be more productive; though given that this is the BBC, not very. I don’t think any of us is at all hopeful of getting this decision over-turned.


    • Hi Caity, thanks very much for your insight on this matter.

      We’re going to revisit this subject in-depth later in the week…

  5. avatar Ian O'Brien says:

    The BBC seem to have gone quiet. Anytime I have complained I get a brief answer and the standard reply…we value your comments etc

  6. avatar stlshawn says:

    season 4 of Primeval,,,, brought back by fans. from what i hear anyway.

  7. avatar stlshawn says:

    Maybe they should just go “ok, but your going on at 11:30 pm at half your original budget”. That would work,,, “why?” you may ask. Because we live in a world of delayed viewing.

    Those of us interested in how such quality entertainment is made, we’ll watch it on delayed viewing. I have learned so much and gained so much respect for the people who work diligently to create such a wonderful show. It’s really wonderful.


  8. I have followed DW since its inception, and I think it is essential to keep DWC because of the people today who may be new to Doctor Who. It has changed in its global coverage and whether or not DWC is broad cast in a particular country or not, fans WILL gain access to it. DWC is one of those programmes which allows people to see behind the scenes, and what it is REALLY doing is helping to generate and inspire the next generation of Doctor Who fans, which, in the long term, is good for the BBC as well as the makers of Doctor Who, but it appears to me that the BBC is just too short sighted.

    However, I do understand that drastic cuts have to be made in the BBC’s budget in response to the deepening recession (depression). If this means SAVING Doctor Who by sacrifices its spin-offs, then I am personally in favour of that move. But I am one of those people who is NOT in favour of the government freezing the Licence fee, which appears to be a main factor in the BBC’s enforced ‘poverty.’ I believe that the government has made a huge mistake; most people I know think that the Licence fee is good value (especially when you consider the alternatives, such as they have in the USA of end to end adverts interrupting shows) and do not mind justifiable increases. These days, paying the License fee in instalments is a very real option, but the BBC do not push this fact enough.

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