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Published on December 17th, 2010 | by Andrew Reynolds

Doctor Who Books for Christmas

I don’t get rid of anything when it comes to matters of commercial greed. I’ll see a desired book, covert its shiny newness, its promise of bright and better ways of enjoying reading again and then put it straight back down, head home and search for it on Abebooks or Amazon – adding it to an ever-growing wish list of items I’ve wanted, catalogued and then totally forgotten about.

Christmas lists (especially Doctor Who related ones) then just consist of little more than a bit of tidying up – deleting those items I lusted after on a whim (so long Apollo 23) and adding those books that still get my pulse racing and mind turning to an ultimate want list for the year.

So with those parameters in check; here’s a list of the surviving items – ordered in desirability.

Doctor Who - The Coming of the Terraphiles1.) Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles by Michael Moorcock

One of sci-fi’s founding fathers transmogrified into the Doctor Who universe? Yes, please. So why the wait? Mostly because i couldn’t see a way the goofy anarchic spirit of the Doctor could meet the wide politically anarchic vistas of the writing of Moorcock – though the humour in a race called the Terraphiles reenacting Earth history leads me to believe that if thereis, like Miggea, a place on the cusp of the next universe and this one, then Moorcock is the man to unite these two worlds perfectly.

Check our review of The Coming of the Terraphiles for more information on this great tale.

2.) Running Through Corridors: Volume 1 – The 60′s by Robert Shearman and Toby Hadoke

Everyone has at least one great Doctor Who marathon experience – so imagine the hi-jinks, wit and general nerdy one-upmanship generated by two long term Who fans writer Robert Shearman (Dalek) and Toby Hadoke (Moth’s Ate my Doctor Who Scarf) chronologically churning their way through two episodes of Who everyday during the 2009 ‘gap year’ concluding with David Tenant’s swansong at the end of that year.

3.) Nuclear Time by Oli Smith

Being the well researched, detailed journalist that I’m not, when it came to interviewing Oli Smith for the Doctor Who Wii console debacle that was Return to Earth, I never got around to reading this novel that the Smith so eloquently and warmly told me was his best work (in my defence I did read his other work.) I feel I owe it to him to read it…plus it has a killer concept: the Doctor is travelling backwards through his own time line while Amy and Rory face a deadly peril in the Doctors future – with them all getting further away from each other with every passing second.

Doctor Who: The Brilliant Book4.) Doctor Who: The Brilliant Book 2011 edited by Clayton Hickman

It might seem that every news agency has grabbed every tiny morsel of gossip out of this tome but with brilliant art work (some by Kasterborous’ own Anthony Dry), a short story by yet another sci-Fi Luminary Brian Aldiss and some fantastic features by regular Who writers like Gareth Roberts; there’s still plenty to get your teeth into while waiting for A Christmas Carol.

5.) Doctor Who: The Writers Tale – The Final Chapter by Russell T. Davies and Benjamin Cook

I’m ashamed I didn’t pick up this 2nd Edition of Davies’ peerless tome into TV writing. It’s a practical, from-the-gut bible for anyone with even the smallest burning literary ambition. It barely left my side during 2009. When marvelling at the brilliant storytelling of this years Christmas special, take a peek back at the sheer hard work and determination it takes to create the programme we all love.

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About the Author

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Everyone has a favourite Doctor and mine - just for his honesty, his fairness and his ability to not notice the Master's awful, awful disguises/anagrams (Sir Gilles Estram!?!) - has to be the Fifth Doctor, Peter Davison. The stories didn’t serve him as well as his acting served those stories.




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