Doctor Who News no image

Published on June 12th, 2007 | by Christian Cawley

Blink Reaction

Admiration of the latest Doctor Who story by the award-winning Steven Moffat, Blink, has been pretty vocal, and I suspect it will continue to be so over the coming months and into awards season.

It was a popular adventure too, bearing in mind the sparsity of the Doctor and Martha; Outpost Gallifrey have reported that the adventure attained an Appreciation Index (AI) figure of 87. This is in sharp contrast to last year’s Doctor-lite Love & Monsters, which managed 76, and is the joint second-best for Series 3.

SFX awarded the episode full marks, loving…

“…the idea of a quantum-locked villain that can’t move while being observed – it’s a superb creation, on the borderline between genius and “Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal” lunacy.”

They also make a point of noting that Blink is another story based on a print adventure…

So that’s a couple of episodes this series based on adaptations of a writer’s older stories (compare Paul Cornell’s “Human Nature”) and it’s a tradition that ought to continue, if these recent episodes are anything to go by – all classics

Admiration of the latest Doctor Who story by the award-winning Steven Moffat, Blink, has been pretty vocal, and I suspect it will continue to be so over the coming months and into awards season.

It was a popular adventure too, bearing in mind the sparsity of the Doctor and Martha; Outpost Gallifrey have reported that the adventure attained an Appreciation Index (AI) figure of 87. This is in sharp contrast to last year’s Doctor-lite Love & Monsters, which managed 76, and is the joint second-best for Series 3.

SFX awarded the episode full marks, loving…

“…the idea of a quantum-locked villain that can’t move while being observed – it’s a superb creation, on the borderline between genius and “Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal” lunacy.”

They also make a point of noting that Blink is another story based on a print adventure…

So that’s a couple of episodes this series based on adaptations of a writer’s older stories (compare Paul Cornell’s “Human Nature”) and it’s a tradition that ought to continue, if these recent episodes are anything to go by – all classics

But the big question at Kasterborous Towers is what, exactly, did the Doctor and Martha get up to in 1969? I mean, opportunity to bump into your previous self or what?!

It seems, though that (UNIT-dating aside) the Doctor opted against looking for invasions by the Cybermen, and instead concentrated on Coronation Street, according to Martha’s blog

You should have seen him, sitting watching the telly eating his dinner off a tray. He looked so uncomfortable. And I know it’s cruel and wrong to laugh at that but him all hunched up on this tiny sofa, his gangly legs sticking out while he ate his beans and watched Coronation Street… it was like the most alien thing I think I’ve seen yet.

Shame we missed Martha in a dollybird-esque mini too, but I can’t complain, not after Sally Sparrow (Carey Mulligan) brightened up my Saturday night…

email


About the Author

A long-term Doctor Who fan, Christian grew up watching the show and has early memories of the Graham Williams era. His favourite stories are Inferno, The Seeds of Doom and Human Nature (although The Empty Child, Blink and Utopia all come close). When he’s not bossing around the news team, Christian is a freelance writer specialising in mobile technology and domestic computing, and enjoys classic rock, cooking and spending time in the countryside with his wife and young children. You can find him on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.




Tell us what you think!

Please be aware that all comments are subject to adherence to our comments policy.
Back to Top ↑