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Published on April 12th, 2006 | by Christian Cawley

A Virtual Waste of Time & Space?

Let’s start with the positives… Welsh company Sequence has been awarded the contract to develop interactive games based on Doctor Who, reports News Wales.

Apparently the contract was won against stiff competition as part of the BBC’s restructing of it’s web content, which probably means that the satellite Doctor Who websites such as “Mickey’s site” will come under their control. According to the BBC’s Official Doctor Who site editor James Goss

“As soon as Doctor Who ends on TV, the adventure continues online, only suddenly you’re helping your heroes, defending the earth, locating alien artefacts, or saving history. It’s the next best thing to travelling in the TARDIS yourself.

Meanwhile the Sequence Creative Director Mark Johnson, pointed out that:

“In the quest for perfection the design and development of the games saw the BBC commissioning content specifically to add to the authenticity of the interaction experience.”

So there certainly seems to be a lot to look forward to in terms of quality online content over the coming months…

Leo McKinstry is well known for his writing on British sporting legends such as Sir Alf Ramsey and Geoff Boycott. According to The First Post – an excellent online magazine to which he contributes – McKinstry is:

“…a Belfast-born author and journalist. He writes regularly for The Daily Mail, Daily Express and The Sunday Telegraph. He has also produced five books including a biography of the Victorian Prime Minister, Lord Rosebery.”

No doubt, therefore, perfectly able to express an open, balanced and well-thought out view of our favourite TV show.

Well, not quite, as he demonstrated in The Times Comment section today. Frankly, you know you’re going to have to pour another mug of coffee at breakfast when your day begins with:

For years we in Britain had our own home-grown, humble version of Star Trek, in the form of the faintly absurd Dr Who, which was, thank goodness, taken off the air in 1989 after almost three decades. It had its pathetic band of adult followers who got together at conventions to discuss time travel or Daleks.

And, you know, it’s an opinion and he’s welcome to his opinion – it’s his and he can do what he wants with it. In fact I’d go as far as to say that it’s a very nice opinion, that while I disagree with it is very well expressed and would rate highly in an “Opinions League Table”. However…

Dr Who remains a cartoon time traveller with a glamorous assistant, fighting alien enemies. This is juvenile fare. It is telling that the modern prince of baby-men, the squeaky-voiced David Beckham, is so hooked that he has never missed an episode and even owns a book of Dr Who scripts.

There is nothing wrong with science fiction. H. G. Wells and Ray Bradbury provided thought-provoking commentaries on the nature of mankind or terrifying visions of the future. But the lame Dr Who is difficult. As with the adult enthusiasm for Harry Potter, the hysterical following for Dr Who is yet another indicator of how infantile we have become.

No doubt this is why, Mr McKinstry, you write non-fiction works.

This topic has been under discussion for some hours in our forum….

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About the Author

A long-term Doctor Who fan, Christian grew up watching the show and has early memories of the Graham Williams era. His favourite stories are Inferno, The Seeds of Doom and Human Nature (although The Empty Child, Blink and Utopia all come close). When he’s not bossing around the news team, Christian is a freelance writer specialising in mobile technology and domestic computing, and enjoys classic rock, cooking and spending time in the countryside with his wife and young children. You can find him on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.




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