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Published on August 21st, 2005 | by Christian Cawley

More Billie!

Bits and bobs have popped up over the last few days so let’s see if we can cover them. We’ll start with this just in – episode three of the next series of Doctor Who, which heralds the return of Elisabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith and also stars Anthony Head, is about to start filming this week! Read more on this at unitnews.co.uk.

Billie Piper featured in an interview with the Independent on Thursday, in which she discussed her career so far. Sadly, the article must be purchased to read it now, however we have the best bits here:

“Well, I’ve not heard any rumours of me being killed off,” she says. “So as far as I’m aware, I’m around for the entire second series.” And after that? “Well, we’ll see.”

Is this the beginning of the contract negotiations for the 3rd series?

On the film Spirit Trap, Billie defends her decision to appear:

“I love horror films…When I was younger, too young to go out on the lash, I would watch horror films and scare myself out of my wits instead. So when the opportunity came to do my own one, I could hardly resist it.

“Look, I love it, I really do, and I fully support it. Actually, all that tabloid nonsense has made me really angry because I’ve upset a lot of good friends I made on that film, but then, you know what? I can’t be arsed to try and persuade everybody how I really feel about it because that just takes more energy than I’ve got.”

On her short but successful career as a pop star, Billie is brief:

“I had an amazing time, but it was also pretty horrible… That’s why I was so happy to walk away, to go off and try to reinvent myself. I never really wanted to be a singer in the first place. I just wanted to act.”

The article concludes:

In many ways, she is a typical 22-year-old, one who likes a drink, a smoke and a night out with the girls. She says she loves her north London neighbourhood, and that she has a set of very dear friends, the kind she has coveted since childhood. Consequently, Hollywood holds little allure for her right now, and the last thing she wants to do is run before she can walk.

And quite frankly, we don’t want to lose her just yet, do we?

The Mirror also ran an article based on this interview.

Billie was also quoted in The Times last week.

You might be very interested to know that the British Film Institute are releasing a book dedicated to Doctor Who as part of their TV Classics range – and what’s more it is written by respected author Kim Newman (Time and Relative):

From 1963 to 1989, for the most part at teatime on Saturdays on BBC1, Doctor Who was a British TV institution. The series had its roots in British science fiction but grew to take in many other influences: historical drama, Hammer horror, satire, conspiracy thriller, even pantomime. Over the years it developed a uniquely eccentric style, at once cosily familiar and cosmically terrifying, and many of its characters, creatures and objects have become indelibly iconic – the Doctors and his assistants, the TARDIS, the Time Lords, and a nightmarish universe of monsters and villains: Cybermen, Ice Warriors, the Master and, of course, the Daleks

The idea that the Doctor should have the power of regeneration was forced on the show’s makers when William Hartnell, the original star, could not carry on. But the changing face of the Doctor became key to the evolution of the series and, for many, whole phases of life are summed up in the casting changes: Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy and, in a one-off incarnation, Paul McGann. Even now, in the shape of Christopher Eccleston, the Doctor is set to return.

In this comprehensive study, Kim Newman follows the Doctor’s travels through time, examining outstanding stories, as well as prominent themes, recurrent character and monster types and the show’s generic positioning between Quatermass and Star Trek, to assess the show as television masterpiece and cultural phenomenon..

Due for release in November, the book will retail at £12. The books promises to be nothing short of fascinating, written as it is by one of the foremost voices in British sci-fi.

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About the Author

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A long-term Doctor Who fan, Christian grew up watching the show and has early memories of the Graham Williams era. His favourite stories are Inferno, The Seeds of Doom and Human Nature (although The Empty Child, Blink and Utopia all come close). When he’s not bossing around the news team, Christian is a freelance writer specialising in mobile technology and domestic computing, and enjoys classic rock, cooking and spending time in the countryside with his wife and young children. You can find him on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.




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